The Devil’s in the Details: Dijon-y Cornish Game Hens with Scalloped Sweet Potatoes

The Devil’s in the Details:  Dijon-y Cornish Game Hens with Scalloped Sweet Potatoes

 

It seems like every dish that comes out of central France has wine in it. I’m not knocking it, but given my choice of beef bourguinon later this week, I wanted something a little less boozy.  Therefore, I chose something mustard-y instead.  Dijon-y, to be more specific.  Mustard can be prepared  many different ways; it all depends on the vinegar and spices used in the preparation.  This particular concoction originated in (wait for it…) Dijon, France in 1856.

The mustard in this case is slathered on a whole cornish hen and broiled resulting in a very flavorful, juicy treat.  I actually used two different mustards for variety- a coarse ground Dijon and a silky garlic aioli, just to mix it up, but it would be perfectly fine with straight up Dijon.  I made it with scalloped sweet potatoes and my favorite, honey walnut haricot verts.  All part of a well-balanced meal.  It’d make a lovely Sunday supper, and I imagine taste just as good cold as it is hot.  Perfect for a picnic basket, though perhaps in another season.  Both recipes are modifications from those taken from Mastering the Art of French Cooking.

Dijon Crusted Cornish Game Hens
Serves 2
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 cornish game hens, halved or quartered
  2. 1 TB butter, melted
  3. 6 TB Dijon mustard
  4. 3 TB finely minced shallots
  5. 1/2 tsp thyme
  6. salt and pepper
  7. 4 cups fresh breadcrumbs, seasoned with salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Preheat the broiler to moderately hot.
  2. Dry the hens, paint with the melted butter and arrange skin-side down in the bottom of the broiling pan. Place it so the surface of the hens are 5-6 inches from the flame. Broil 10 minutes on each side, basting every five minutes. Meat should be lightly browned.
  3. Blend the mustard, shallots and herbs in a bowl. Paint the hen pieces with the mustard.
  4. Pour the crumbs into a big plate, then roll the hens into the crumbs, thoroughly coating them.
  5. Add the hen, skin-side down back to the broiler. Brown slowly for 10 minutes. Turn, baste with the pan juices, and brown 10 minutes more on the other side. The hen is done when the thickest part of the drumstick is tender and juices run clear.
Adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking
Adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking
The Hungary Buddha Eats the World http://thehungarybuddha.com/
 
 
 
 
S
Scalloped Sweet Potatoes
Serves 4
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 pounds sweet potatoes (6-7 cups when sliced)
  2. 6 ounces goat cheese
  3. salt and pepper
  4. 1 cup boiling milk
  5. parsley, as a topper
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 425F
  2. Peel and slice the potatoes to about 1/8 inch thick.
  3. Butter a baking dish about 10 inches in diameter and 2 inches deep (no shallower). Spread half of the potatoes in the bottom of the dish. Divide half of the cheese over them, and season with salt and pepper. Arrange the remaining potatoes over the first layer, and season them. Spread on the rest of the cheese and pour on the boiling milk. Bake 20-30 minutes or until potatoes are tender, milk has been absorbed and the top is nicely browned. Garnish with parsley.
Adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking
Adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking
The Hungary Buddha Eats the World http://thehungarybuddha.com/

Related Posts

Coconut Cashew Brittle Ice Cream

Coconut Cashew Brittle Ice Cream

Coconut Cashew Brittle Ice Cream :no-churn coconut ice cream with salted cashew brittle I’ve made more ice cream! Ahhhh! I’m sorry. Should I just start calling this Chrissy’s Ice Cream blog?  Gah. I really do try to control myself. It happened accidentally on a whim, […]

Just Because: Ricotta Crepes with Orange Curd and Blueberries

Just Because: Ricotta Crepes with Orange Curd and Blueberries

So I made these crepes. As far as I know, they are not Central American. I’d like to be able to tell you that the citrus was inspired by that area because citrus is a big deal there (which, I guess it is, kind of). […]



0 thoughts on “The Devil’s in the Details: Dijon-y Cornish Game Hens with Scalloped Sweet Potatoes”

Leave a Reply


Optimization WordPress Plugins & Solutions by W3 EDGE